Requests for expressions of interest for non-network solutions to address power system security requirements.


Under the National Electricity Rules (NER) the responsibility to resolve fault level and inertia shortfalls and Network Support and Control Ancillary Services (NSCAS) gaps lies with the Transmission Network Service Provider (TNSP) or jurisdictional planning body for the region. In Queensland, Powerlink is responsible for providing and procuring power system security services and must address these technical issues as efficiently as possible once they are identified by the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO).

 


REQUEST FOR POWER SYSTEM SECURITY SERVICES IN CENTRAL, SOUTHERN AND BROADER QUEENSLAND REGIONS

Powerlink is engaging with Registered Participants in the National Electricity Market (NEM) and interested parties to ascertain and evaluate options (both non-network and network) to meet the power system security requirements identified in the Australian Energy Market Operator’s (AEMO ) 2021 System Security Reports: System Strength, Inertia and NSCAS and Update to 2021 System Security Reports (Reports), published on 17 December 2021 and 11 May 2022 respectively. 

The Reports declared

  • an immediate system strength shortfall of up to 90 MVA at the Gin Gin fault level node to be addressed by March 2023 and
  • an NSCAS gap in South Queensland of up to 250 MVAr to be addressed immediately.

Potential proponents of non-network solutions are encouraged to contact Powerlink prior to the lodgement of submissions for further clarification and/or assistance if required.

Submissions close COB Friday, 24 June 2022.

It is anticipated the results of the EOI assessment will be known in September 2022 and Powerlink will provide a further update at this time.

HOW TO SUBMIT AN EOI

Contact details:

Nathaniel Dunnett | Manager, Portfolio Planning and Optimisation
Powerlink Queensland
PO Box 1193
VIRGINIA QLD 4014
Tel:  (07) 3860 2111

Submissions can be emailed to [email protected].
Click to email your submission


A copy of the Request for Power System Security Services document is available below.

 


System strength is a measure of the stability of a power system under all reasonably possible operating conditions. It describes a system’s overall performance and its ability to recover quickly from sudden events.

Synchronous generators – like coal, gas and hydro power stations – provide system strength when they generate. System strength can also be provided by machines called synchronous condensers.

Asynchronous generators – like wind and solar – do not provide system strength and require system strength from another source.

While a system strength shortfall is very unlikely to impact the ongoing supply of electricity to customers in Queensland, it may limit an asynchronous generator's capability to export power to the grid. Queensland has a broad mix of generation types located across various regions in the state which can be accessed through our transmission network in the unlikely event that supply is impacted.

The Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) is responsible for setting the minimum required level of system strength throughout the National Electricity Market (NEM). When a region is identified as not having the required system strength, AEMO declares a shortfall.

As with other Market Notices, it is simply designed to send a signal to the market that a response is required.

AEMO periodically re-evaluates the required minimum fault levels throughout the NEM to minimise the risk of a sudden, widespread loss of supply due to an unforeseen event that impacts system strength.

AEMO has conducted studies of the Queensland power system. This modelling includes detailed models of synchronous generators from major coal-fired, gas-fired and hydro power stations in Queensland. Only inverter-based plants not subject to the system strength remediation requirements were considered in this requirement determination.

AEMO describes NSCAS as non-market ancillary services that may be delivered to maintain power system security and reliability, or to maintain or increase the power transfer capability of the transmission network. For example, these may include services which can be provided by plant with reactive power absorption capability such as synchronous generators or battery energy storage systems.

The Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) is responsible for assessing the voltage control requirements throughout the National Electricity Market (NEM). When a region is identified as not being able to maintain acceptable voltages to keep the power system in a secure state, AEMO declares a gap.

As with other Market Notices, it is simply designed to send a signal to the market that a response is required.

AEMO periodically re-evaluates system requirements throughout the NEM to minimise the risk of a sudden, widespread loss of supply due to an unforeseen event that impacts power system security.

Based on the synchronous generator dispatch associated with AEMO’s defined minimum fault level, AEMO has declared a gap in reactive power absorption in South East Queensland.